Monthly Archives: September 2012

How to crate train your puppy

Make the crate a happy place

Young puppies 8-12 weeks old have little bladder control so it is important to introduce the crate as a happy place and only leave them inside for no longer than 30 minutes.  Purchase a divider and place it so that the puppy has just enough room to turn around and lay down. If you give the puppy too much room they will use the back part of the crate.  Puppies respond  to positive praise so encourage the puppy to enter the crate by using treats or feeding them inside the crate. Start in small increments of time. Each time you remove your puppy from the crate give him lots of praise and take him directly outside. Give your puppy a command to use the bathroom, “busy”. Once your dog has gone then it is time to play as a reward for not going inside the crate. If you have a young puppy you may want to carry them outside and put them where you want them to “busy”. Your puppy should spend time with you outside the crate playing, training, exploring etc.  Always keep the door open so that your puppy can go in on his own. You will find that when the puppy identifies this area as their “den” they will choose to go in the crate to sleep, or have some time alone.  When you put the puppy back in the crate, keep the crate close to you. This will give your puppy the security they need to make the crate feel like a safe and happy place.

When to use the crate

Puppies are curious and busy little creatures.  Crates keep your puppy safe and often out of trouble if you are not able to monitor their every move. Use your crate when you are away but keep in mind that the younger the dog the less amount of time they can stay in their crate. Most dog sleep in their crate at night. This is a great option since dogs  don’t like to sleep where they soil.

Crate training do’s and dont’s

DO:

  • “Busy” your dog before putting him in the crate.
  • Do remove his collar while in the crate. Dog can get their collars caught on the crate and hurt themselves if you don’t remove the collar.
  • Do remove blankets, toys and anything else your dog could eat or choke on while alone in his crate.
  • Do give yourself the peace of mind knowing your dog is safe in his crate.
  • Do save yourself money by  not having to replace shoes, furniture and other important things in your house.

DONT’S

-Don’t use the crate as punishment

-Don’t put your puppy in the crate if they are vomiting, have diarrhea, or other illnesses

  • Don’t leave your puppy in the crate for hours at a time
  • Don’t force your puppy inside the crate by pushing or dragging him inside. Let him go in on his own. Use treats if necessary.
  • Don’t punish your puppy if he “busy” in the crate. Just remove the puppy and clean it up without saying anything about it.  When they are young it is best not to put anything but the plastic tray in the crate. It makes for easy clean ups

Remember the success to crate training is patients and consistency. The more consistent you are in setting a routine and making the crate a happy place the more successful your training will be.  Also remember, puppies are like babies they need love, encouragement and patients to be succesful.

Acorns are dangerous to dogs

Tomorrow is the first day of fall.  Just a reminder while you and your dog spend time outside enjoying the wonderful fall weather, keep them away from acorns.

Acorns according to Dr. Marianne Bailey for the capital states, “They contain toxins that are produced by the oak trees and can cause stomach upset and kidney disease. Illness results after consuming large quantities of young oak leaves in the spring or green acorns in the fall. Clinical signs include loss of appetite, lethargy, dehydration, increased thirst and urination and constipation. Blood work may reveal elevated kidney values as well as changes in the electrolytes. In serious, but very rare cases, death may result. Kidney disease is much more common in sheep and cattle than in dogs.

Acorns can also cause harm in your dog if they swallow them whole. They can get trapped in your dogs intestines and cause gastrointestinal obstruction. If you see your dog eating large amounts of acorns or suspect that your dog has eaten acorns see your veterinarian immediately.

English: Fall leaves and acorns

English: Fall leaves and acorns (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Super Zoo Experience

Last week I attended for the first time the Super Zoo pet trade show. It was very overwhelming, there were over 800 vendors at the show. What a great place to get to see the latest trends in pet products, the newest products and problem solvers. They had everything hair bows, booties, treats, toys, leashes, safety products and health products.

There are some definite trends taking shape that I notice at the show. Grain Free and all natural treats were huge. Everyone was looking for treats that are easy on a dogs digestive system. Studies have shown that dogs with allegories can eat and digest grain free treats. All natural dog food and treats were huge as well, we have all heard the horrid stories of the processing plants and slaughter-house that process many of the dog foods and treats. People are looking for things that their dogs want to eat and that are good for them. I couldn’t help notice that the booths that sold raw hide had fewer people inquiring about the products than those who sold all natural products. The antlers, bully sticks, freeze dry chicken, cod etc. were all crowded booths.  I am sure you will start to see more of these items in pet stores.

Made in the USA was the other thing that really stood out to me at the show. I can only assume with the recent recall of many products from China that USA companies wanted to give everyone the confidence in their product. I heard many people ask where the items were made. I was really glad to see that people are wanting to invest in America. title=”Latest recalls”>http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm319021.htm

If anyone else attended this same show I would love to hear your takes on the products you saw at Super Zoo.

greatpup

Hello world,
I am Peggy and this is my first blog post. I have decided since so many people ask me advice about raising dogs that I would start to blog. I am the owner of an e-commerce store greatpup.com. I currently have two labs that are my pets and one guide dog that I am training for the foundation for the blind. This is the third puppy I have raised for the foundation. I hope have many blogs stories and pictures of my adventures of raising a puppy. Is this something you would like to hear about? Here is a picture of my labs the smaller one is the first puppy I raised 3 years ago.

View original post

The Daily What: When Life Gives You Lemons

Great puppy! Super great music. Good thing it was a burnese mountain dog because if it was a lab he would have eaten the lemon. Labs eat everything !

iFun & Fail


Nilah, an 8-week-old Bernese Mountain Dog puppy, obviously doesn’t know what to do when life gives her a lemon.

Bonus: The music is perf.

Get moar newz hot off teh internetz ober @ The Daily What!

Submitted by:
Unknown

Tagged: Afternoon Snack, burmese mountain dog puppy, category:video, dog, when life gives you lemons

View original post

Hello blogging world

Hello world,
I am Peggy and this is my first blog post. I have decided since so many people ask me advice about raising dogs that I would start to blog. I am the owner of an e-commerce store greatpup.com. I currently have two labs that are my pets and one guide dog that I am training for the foundation for the blind. This is the third puppy I have raised for the foundation. I hope have many blogs stories and pictures of my adventures of raising a puppy. Is this something you would like to hear about? Here is a picture of my labs the smaller one is the first puppy I raised 3 years ago.

greatpup

For people who treat their dog as a member of the family. This blog will give you the latest product trends for your dog as well as tips and news to make your dog a greatpup.

%d bloggers like this: